EXCELLENT 4.8

Certify Your Service Dog

Certification is offered for completion of one of our training programs and Public Access Test.

Please note that certifying your service dog is NOT required by federal law. Under the ADA, service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities.

If you are enrolled in one of our training programs, we will provide you with a certification of completion of our training program after you pass the Public Access Test (PAT). The PAT is given in person, however, during COVID-19, it will be done from a distance, so you’ll need to film and submit an evaluation video to be certified. This certificate will attest that you and your dog are a service dog team and that you meet the requirements set by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Our Public Access Test is an assessment based on the test developed by Assistance Dog International and has become the standard for most service dog organizations.

Once you pass the assessment, you will receive an ID and certificate from us as a proof that your dog has met our standards and is a fully trained service dog by all legal definitions of the law.

What Will You Need to have Your Dog Certified?

If you are enrolled in one of our training programs, we will provide you with a certification of completion of our training program after you pass the Public Access Test (PAT).

Our public access test (PAT) details Service Dog teams’ minimum public access behaviors for responsible service dog handling. This includes unacceptable behaviors, obedience behaviors, and behavior in different locations and situations.

The test items are in a yes-or-no format. The team must be successful on all items of the test to pass.

Description of Test Result Comment
The dog was on-leash, under control, and waited calmly outside the vehicle, attentive to the commands of the handler. Yes
The dog entered the building through the door in a calm manner. Yes
The dog walked beside the handler in a controlled way. Yes
The dog adjusted to changes in the handler's speed. The dog did not pull on the leash. Yes
The dog maneuvered calmly through a crowed of people without trying to interact with people. Yes
The dog did not attempt to eat or sniff food. The dog ignored food and other distractions in the restaurant. Yes
The dog remained in the sit position and was relaxed as a shopping cart passed by. Yes
The dog remained composed during noise distraction. Yes
The dog demonstrated calm behavior and no fear around traffic, noise, and distractions. Yes
The dog responded to the "sir", "stay", "down" command with no more than two commands by the handler. Yes
The dog should be able to maintain a working mode while in the presence of other dogs. Yes
The dog came within the appropriate distance of the handler, so that the handler could recall the dog. Yes